How to Make Homemade Toothpaste – ‘Earthpaste’ Inspired

Today I’m thrilled to share with you how to make homemade toothpaste inspired by my favorite ‘Earthpaste’.

How to Make Homemade Toothpaste-Earthpaste Inspired

I have used many different natural toothpastes in the past but recently I tried ‘Earthpaste’ and totally fell in love with it. It’s my favorite toothpaste so I started experimenting with a DIY version, and am happy to say I came up with a recipe with a taste and texture almost identical.

You can barely tell the difference in the picture above (the one on the top portion of the toothbrush is ‘Earthpaste’ and directly below is my homemade version). The homemade version comes in at 50-60 percent less cost per ounce, which makes this girl very happy :)

The base of this recipe is mineral rich Redmond Clay, which draws out toxins and micro-organisms, increases circulation and is anti-inflammatory, which promotes healthy gums and teeth. Add to that the power of liquid trace minerals and you’ve got yourself a nice recipe to promote remineralization of your pearly whites.

To learn more about Redmond Clay you can watch this short video.

The ingredients in a tube of ‘Earthpaste’ are pretty straightforward; purified water, food grade Redmond Clay®, xylitol, essential oil, Redmond Real Salt®, tea tree oil.

So it was fairly easy to duplicate, I omitted the tea tree oil because I’ve never been a fan of the taste in my toothpaste, and after some playing around I was able to find the ratio of ingredients that came the closest to the real thing.

Homemade Toothpaste –  ‘Earthpaste’ Inspired

How to Make Homemade Toothpaste-Earthpaste Inspired

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

  1. Using non-metal measuring spoons, mixing bowls and stirring spoons, place clay into a mixing bowl
  2. Add water, start with 2 Tbsp and work your way up to achieve the consistency you like (3 Tbsp works well for me) and mix well
  3. Add essential oil, stevia OR xylitol, sea salt, and liquid minerals
  4. Taste and adjust flavor as desired. If the flavor is close enough to your liking it’s a good idea to wait for 48 hours to make any further adjustments as the flavors will intensify
  5. Store in a glass jar or reusable toothpaste tube

Note: Keep in mind this is not a foaming toothpaste, which may take some getting used to at first but you will notice it ultimately does a much better job at keeping your mouth fresh and healthy. You’ll want to keep your toothpaste sealed well to prevent it from drying out. If it starts to dry out just add a little purified water to loosen it back up.

Other good flavors of essential oils to experiment with are cinnamon, orange, lemon, or wintergreen.

If you’re not into the idea of this clay based recipe my other toothpaste recipe combines coconut oil and the whitening power of baking soda with other ingredients (recipe here). Plus in the same post I give you a heads up on common toxic ingredients in most store bought toothpaste to avoid and the dangers in using it.

Another excellent natural option I like to use for teeth whitening and to support overall oral health is activated charcoal.

If you’re new to Earthpaste and would rather try it ready made first, or don’t want to make your own, you can get it here.

I hope you enjoy the benefits of this homemade toothpaste as much as I do! If you make it, let us know what you thought in the section below!

12 Comments

  1. G.C.Horton

    Thanks for the terrific toothpaste recipe. I think I’ll add tea tree oil to my batch. I like the taste, although my girlfriend says tea tree oil tastes like kerosene to her. I like it!

    I didn’t know Redmond produced clay. I’ve been using their RealSalt for years. It’s the best salt I’ve every cooked with and I wouldn’t use anything else. So, I’m sure their clay is the best too.

    I enjoyed the video.

    1. Jess

      You’re welcome G.C.! too funny about your girlfriend and tea tree lol! I love using it in my cleaning products and other external applications but don’t like the taste. I’m really curious to find out how your toothpaste turns out with the addition of it, you’ll have to let me know :)

      Great to hear that you know Redmond and enjoy their salt, they are such a great company with an awesome clay source, I hope you end up loving their clay as much as I do – you can actually take it internally for cleansing, and make poultices for burns, bug bites, stings, and rashes – but that’s a whole other article…to be continued lol :)

  2. casey

    that earth paste is pretty cool i like the video explaining the clay gives you a better idea of whats in it. i liked how the content is easy to get through and not too long. also heard of people using coconut oil for toothpaste you ever heard of that?? my friend uses coconut oil for brushing teeth and says its bad to swallow it after.

    1. Jess

      Thanks Casey! Even though clay toothpaste is my absolute fav I do also have a coconut oil toothpaste recipe I use too. It uses baking soda for it’s whitening power too. Coconut oil has so many uses and oil pulling is another, where you swish it around in your mouth first thing in the morning (see my article here) to pull out toxins for dental health. Your friend is right on, you want to try and not swallow coconut oil or any toothpaste since it’s loaded with all the bacteria you just brushed out of your mouth.

  3. Gina

    This is so interesting. It also seems kind of gross in a way haha. I’m sure it would take a while getting used to it. My boyfriend gets sores in his mouth from toothpaste so he might be open to trying this with me! Getting rid of the chemicals from regular toothpaste would be a big step in our health. I’m glad I came across this site.

    1. Jess

      Haha, I totally get it, Gina! Putting clay in your mouth does sound kind of gross at first. But seriously this is my absolute favorite toothpaste ever, it really is so pepperminty that you don’t taste clay at all and the texture is silky smooth, not gritty at all, as you may imagine “dirt” to be haha! I would have to say, the biggest change for most people is the fact that it doesn’t foam like a conventional toothpaste.

      This would be an incredible choice for you guys, especially given the sores in your boyfriends mouth, sounds like his mouth is not liking regular toothpastes. I really hope you will give this a try, I know your mouths will like it much better :) I would love to hear how you like it :)

  4. SamDal

    Awesome toothpaste Jess! I never use flouride based toothpaste and have recently started experimenting with my own as well.

    I find if you add one small drop of mint oil to the mix, it gives it a fresh, minty taste and leaves your mouth smelling like you just brushed with Colgate – minus the toxic chemicals of course.

    Loving your blog, it’s what we need alot more of these days – natural stuff from the earth is what our bodies need, not chemistry experiments in labs!

    1. Jess

      Thanks Sam! It’s kinda crazy when you learn the effects flouride can have on our bodies and brains long term, and what’s worse is the fact that it’s added to tap water.

      You’re absolutely right, the peppermint oil gives this toothpaste that minty fresh taste/feeling from a 100% natural essential oil instead of synthetic flavors. Thanks for your comment and to your health and happiness :)

  5. Alex

    Interesting article. You learn something new every day. I have always been use to the more common brands of tooth paste. I didn’t even know tooth paste was possible to make at home. The amount of things clay could be used for is surprising. I think it would taste kind of funny wouldn’t iit?

    1. Jess

      Thanks Alex, glad you enjoyed the post. It actually doesn’t taste funny at all, although it seems like the clay would, you don’t taste it, the peppermint is what you taste.

    1. I have but I prefer just to add somee charcoal seperately to my toothbrush and brush with it before the toothpaste. If you do add it I would recommend starting with a little at time since it’s easy to overdo it. You may also have to add more essential oil drops for more flavor since the charcoal can take away some of it. Love to hear your feedback if you do try it!

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